The battle to save Bristol Bay fishery continues today as Pebble Limited Partnership has applied for its mining permits. According to our friends at Save Bristol Bay, “Pebble has not released the permit application to the public,” but Save Bristol Bay will update everyone on what will need to happen to ensure the mine will never be built.

Again from Save Bristol Bay, a few details of the application are certain:

1.The science is STILL clear – Pebble mine is too risky in Bristol Bay due to the type, size and location of deposit.

2. It’s time to get even more serious about speaking up, spreading the word and staying informed.

3.Decision makers and those involved in the permitting process need to hold Pebble to the highest standard of review possible. Bristol Bay is too important for anything less. Click here to tell our decision makers to hold Pebble to the highest standards possible.

Intricate Bay Lodge

Recreation and tourism spending in Bristol Bay bring $90 million annually to the state. In 2007, anglers in Alaska spent nearly $1.4 billion on fishing trips, fishing equipment, and development and maintenance of land used primarily for the pursuit of sport fishing in Alaska.

Bristol Bay sport fishing supports 846 full and part-time jobs and accounts for $27 million in total wages and benefits paid to employees and proprietors.

Bristol Bay is the most productive sockeye salmon ecosystem in the world. The watershed supports the largest sockeye salmon run on the planet, producing 46% of the world’s wild sockeye harvest.

The mine, even without disaster could potentially destroy 94 miles of salmon streams and 5,350 acres of wetlands, lakes, and ponds.

Bristol Bay is too precious to risk. Voice your opinion before it’s too late. 

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